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Would you tune into a Casey Anthony reality series?

Especially to one that doesn’t take place behind bars?

A couple of years ago, the very idea of the Casey Anthony docuseries‘ existence was an affront to basic decency. That it exists at all is a pretty effective condemnation of our entertainment culture’s total lack of moral standards.

The decent thing to do after an unthinkable acquittal makes you one of the most notorious people on the planet is to fade into obscurity. Casey Anthony reportedly wants to become a reality star.

Casey Anthony smiles in a way that nauseates most people in 2011.
Casey Anthony smiles before the start of her sentencing hearing on charges of lying to a law enforcement officer at the Orange County Courthouse July 7, 2011. (Photo Credit: Joe Burbank-Pool/Getty Images)

Casey Anthony wants her own reality TV series

The New York Post reports that the infamous Casey Anthony has submitted a proposal for her own show.

Now 37, her pitch suggests “an intimate window into the daily life of one of the most controversial women in America.”

“In each episode, Casey will go about her day — working, socializing, dating,” the proposal ominously explains.

Casey Anthony in court in June of 2011.
Casey Anthony listens to the testimony of Krystal Holloway, who claims to have had an affair with Anthony’s father, during her murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse on June 30, 2011. (Photo Credit: Red Huber-Pool/Getty Images)

“She will share her thoughts and opinions,” the proposal reportedly threatens, “and will give an intimate look into her world.”

Believe it or not, the infamously acquitted former mother has people willing to associate with her.

The show would include “members of Casey’s trusted inner circle, many of whom have never spoken out before.”

Lots of people will shamelessly embarrass themselves for reality TV, but this is on a whole new level.

Casey Anthony in court in July of 2011.
Casey Anthony reacts to being found not guilty on murder charges at the Orange County Courthouse on July 5, 2011. (Photo Credit: Red Huber-Pool/Getty Images)

Will this Casey Anthony reality series actually come to be?

At the moment, even the generally less-than-brilliant heads of TV networks are balking at the proposal.

“I think that’s a losing bet,” one network executive expressed to The New York Post. “It would get a large audience initially, but what’s really that interesting about her life? Plus the backlash would be huge. Not worth it.”

It hasn’t even been two decades since the massive O.J. Simpson backlash over If I Did It. That hasn’t stopped some bonkers O.J. Simpson books from cropping up, but some things are just too heinous to endorse.

Should Peacock have given Casey Anthony her own docuseries? Absolutely not.

It’s understandable that this infamous 37-year-old would think that people want to see her received thousands of dollars to go about her life, gloating about her freedom.

After all, Peacock’s morally bankrupt docuseries in 2022 allowed Casey Anthony to imply that her father had murdered her daughter, Caylee.

Once you get away with something — like getting to spin your story on your very own docuseries — you start to think that you can do whatever you want. And, tragically, our society will endorse a lot of garbage in the name of “entertainment.”

Casey Anthony tears up on her Hulu docuseries.
On her very own docuseries in 2022, Casey Anthony cried and attempted to appear sympathetic. (Image Credit: Hulu)

Does Casey Anthony deserve her own reality TV series?

Many would say that someone accused of murdering her own 2-year-old daughter does not, in fact, deserve reality stardom.

In fact, even people who believe that the jury made the right call in acquitting her would say that someone who waited weeks to call the police about her missing toddler and then lied to authorities during the search for her maybe doesn’t get to become a TV personality.

And, as even higher-ups in the television industry have noted, would there be anything interesting to the show aside from her notoriety? We don’t need to watch O.J. Simpson go to the grocery store and we don’t need to watch Casey Anthony plan a birthday party.